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Dry Summer Warnings Signal Trouble for NW Salmon

There are signs this summer could be a bad one for the native salmon of the Northwest.

Already, drought has gripped the region, causing low river flows that could be hard for fish to navigate or spawn in. That’s bad news for species already teetering on extinction, especially in the Columbia River Basin.

Betsy Emery, advocacy and campaign manager for the Association of Northwest Steelheaders, said a study this year from the Nez Perce Tribe predicted 77% of Snake River Chinook salmon will be nearly extinct in four years if current trends hold.

“Our salmon runs cannot afford one catastrophic event that can really devastate the potential for salmon recovery,” she said, “and so far, we’re seeing a lot of red flags that indicate we could see a catastrophic event like that this summer.”

More than 90% of Washington is experiencing drought considered “severe” or worse, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Emery said wildfire is another concern, which can cause poor water stream quality. While wildfires have the potential to improve quality in the long run, Emery said the endangered fish might not have that much time. She noted that humans can’t improve habitat for salmon overnight – and have little control over drought or changing ocean patterns because of climate change.

“The only thing that we have immediate action and control over is the function and existence of the lower Snake River dams,” she said. “There’s significant science that connects those dams to hot water and devastating mortality for the salmon that are swimming through.”

She said the dams are especially harmful for the juvenile salmon that pass through them.

U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, proposed a plan for the region that included breaching the Snake River dams, but elected leaders in Oregon and Washington have sidelined it. However, Emery said they’ve kept dam breaching on the table. She added that what’s important right now is that leaders identify a clear pathway to salmon recovery.

“The clock is ticking. We do not have time for some sort of lengthy process,” she said. “We need an aggressive timeline that provides funding for the bold actions that we need to take.”


Erik Tegethoff headshot
Eric Tegethoff | WNS

Eric Tegethoff is a journalist covering the Northwest. Eric has worked as a reporter for KBOO, XRAY FM, and Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland, Oregon, as well as other print and digital news media. In 2012, Eric traveled to North Dakota to write about the Bakken region oil boom. He’s also worked at a movie theater, as a campaign canvasser and quality assurance at a milk packaging factory. Eric is originally from Orlando, Florida. He graduated from the University of Florida in 2010.

The above article was provided by Washington News Service. The Auburn Examiner has not independently verified its content.

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